Copenhagen Fashion Summit

It is more than evident that fashion as an industry has over the last couple of years been facing disruption – both from the outside and within. The declining sales and shops closing that ensued the grim reports and even grimmer prognosis of the market have proven merely a physical manifestation of a spirit in turmoil.
The world evolved and the garment industry failed to keep up.
Abundant and heavily intertwined, premises for dysfunction exposed a more serious issue – the one of a heavily flawed foundation which the fashion industry has based its business model on. And whilst the rabbit’s hole of reasoning aiming to come to the core of the problem has been taken into account by the industry’s heavy-weighters, the solution to such a formidably faulty system is bound to be as complex as its precursor. And yet the one issue that keeps popping up during the discussions attempting to map out a solution is (maybe unsurprisingly) the one of the industry’s sustainability. 

As the saying goes – all roads lead to Rome – or at least they pass by it as sustainability is as miscellaneous a topic as the problem is cluttered.
By brushing over every aspect of the pickle called fashion, sustainability is seemingly the answer to the industry in turmoil, which while addressing everything from overproduction to blind consumerism to gender equality, is presenting itself as a too-good-to-believe solution that doesn’t necessarily feel like Goliath’s task. Indeed the issue of sustainability proposes for a cleverer virtuosity to its approach than itchy hemp t-shirts or a single collection of bohemian kaftans produced by a giant high-street chain once a year.
As the issue addresses numerous aspects of the production-to-consumer model, a process that has so far been a linear one, there are many places brands and shoppers alike can stop and make small changes to a bigger impact.


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Altering the system is not a preface for utopian bohemianism, but rather the matter of responsibility one has in order to obtain and live in a world that is functioning better than yesterday.
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Every single step in the model – from growing and harvesting raw materials to the finalization and life-span of a product can be consciously affected and altered in the pursuit towards a more sustainable future. And while the banality of the disruption of a system that is in it’s core an elitists one – as in the case of fashion – is seemingly hard to swallow, the issues risen are far beyond the concern of ‘fashion brands’ only –they affect the garment industry and thus world as a whole. Thus altering the system is not a preface for utopian bohemianism, but rather the matter of responsibility one has in order to obtain and live in a world that is functioning better than yesterday.

Thus The Copenhagen Fashion Summit is clear in its message as it yet again – in it’s fifth edition gathers some of the world’s biggest thinkers, industry leaders and other strong voices in order to brainstorm and engage in the most critical issues that the industry and planet faces today. Their call to action, especially shifting towards a circular system of consumption rather than ‘make, take, waste’ as labeled in the first issue of ‘Pulse report’ is the first in many incentives towards a better future.


The world evolved and the garment industry failed to keep up.

Here on MINT we will closely follow the summit through a variety of articles as sustainability is an issue close to home and heart, aspiring to translate the summit’s most relevant points to concomitantly address our concerns as well as the concerns of our reader.